Thursday, August 17, 2017

Quote for the Day



Coins and Notes

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Just as people throw coins into wishing wells for good luck or to make a wish, so there is also a tradition in various parts of England (and elsewhere) of hammering coins into trees for the same reasons. The tradition dates back hundreds of years, back to the days when it was believed that deities and spirits lived in trees and that offerings could be rewarded. The coins are usually knocked into felled tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. Removing a coin, however, will bring bad luck and illness.

Gallery:






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Some coin (and money) trivia, which I call Bytecoin . . .
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Australia introduced decimal currency on February 14, 1966, which put an end to the traditional sixpence and threepence (the latter pronounced “thrippence”, the “thrip” rhyming with “skip”) into Christmas puddings for lucky finders on Christmas day after dinner, Decimal coins, being made of different metals, can’t be used in the puddings.

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The Holey dollar is the name given to coins used in the early history of two British settlements: Prince Edward Island (now part of Canada) and New South Wales (now part of Australia). The middle was punched out of Spanish dollars, creating two parts: a small coin, known as a "dump" in Australia, and a "holey dollar". This coin was one of the first coins struck in Australia.

The Holey Dollar

The Dump
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The dollar sign is believed to have originated from old Spanish eight reale coins (the coins known to pirates as “pieces of eight”). The reverse of these coins features a pillar of Hercules with a ribbon wrapped around, looking very much like the modern $ symbol.

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The word dollar comes from the European town of Joachimsthal, where silver was mined in the 1500s and then turned into coins called Joachimsthalers (pic below). Over the years, this name was shortened to ‘thaler’, and eventually became ‘dollar’.

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Quote for the Day



Interesting pics

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At the end of the track. Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park.
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384 Pound Black Sea Bass Caught by Franklin Schenck off Catalina Island, California
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Construction worker
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Australian rugby player, 1870’s
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Young Princess Elizabeth II  with her mother Queen Elizabeth I (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon) (1900-2002), future Queen Mother. 1937
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The future Queen Elizabeth II, with her father King George VI, and the Queen Mother.
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Great Britain, c 1942
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Original Hollywood sign, 1925
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Jackie Kennedy leaves Parkland Hospital after the assassination of JFK. When asked whether she would like to change her blood stained clothing, she replied “No. Let them see what they’ve done to Jack.”

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson takes the Oath of Office to assume the Presidency of the United States, following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy
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JFK and Jackie whilst they were dating
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Original Caption: Edison, Kern County, California. Young migratory mother, originally from Texas on the day before the photograph was made she and her husband traveled 35 miles each way to pick peas. They worked 5 hours each and together earned $2.25. They have two young children... Live in auto camp.
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Humphrey Bogart, age 2. Here’s looking at you, kid.
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During the Great Depression, when flour manufacturers saw women turning their flour sacks into clothing, diapers, dish cloths, and more, they started packing their flour in pretty patterns. The sacks came with bright, colourful designs, and sometimes patterns for toys. The sacks were labelled, but the ink was washable. It's estimated that during the Depression, 3.5 million women and children were wearing clothing and using items made from flour sacks.

The children pictured above are wearing clothes made from the flour sacks. 

These women are also wearing flour sack dresses.
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Cleaning a corner ornamentation eagle of the Chrysler Building, 1932
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Christians protect Muslims during prayer in the midst of the uprisings in Cairo, Egypt, in 2011.